While there have been efforts to improve the management of this disease, there is a considerable need to support and empower patients living with mBC along the care continuum.

Can you develop disruptive technology-enabled solutions to help enrich the lives of patients living with mBC?

Technology-enabled solutions should address one or more of the key patient needs below. These needs are identified from the “Global Status of Advanced Metastatic Breast Cancer 2005-2015 Decade Report” that assessed the needs of patients with mBC globally. 

  • An intuitive, customizable and tailored care management solution that improves care and disease management for patients living with mBC, incorporating a comprehensive approach to well-being across the care continuum
  •  Solutions to support mBC patients with their daily living and enrich their lives
  • Solutions to help patients living with mBC engage and support one another

This is not an exercise to develop tools for specific disease interventions or technologies for clinical therapy decisions. Successful tech-enabled solutions will support and empower individuals living with mBC along the care continuum. These solutions will be responsive to mBC patients’ needs and experiences as they move through different stages of the disease. Recognition should also be made that solutions cannot take a “one-size-fits-all” approach, and each should have the functionality to be tailored to meet individual patient needs and healthcare environment.


An intuitive, customizable, and tailored care management solution that improves care and disease management for patients living with mBC, incorporating a comprehensive approach to well-being across the care continuum.

A patient’s core healthcare team plays a critical role in the day-to-day treatment and management of their disease. Along the care continuum, from initial diagnosis through to end-of-life care, a multitude of considerations must be taken into account beyond treatment, for patients living with mBC. These include psychosocial well-being to manage the emotional and physical impact of the disease or its treatment, supportive care such as managing pain, quality of life, and access to information for patients and caregivers.8

Provision of services and support that can help to address this range of needs can sometimes be fragmented along the care continuum, and more must be done to improve multidisciplinary, comprehensive, and individualized approaches to patient care.

Solutions to support mBC patients with their daily living and enrich their lives.

mBC most commonly affects women in middle to late stages of life and can place a significant burden on the daily life of patients and their families. Women often have unique roles as mothers and family caregivers, and being responsible for organizing and running their households, whilst maintaining a job outside the home. Due to the impact of the disease and its treatment, mBC may hinder patients’ abilities to complete daily tasks such as driving to work or school, caring for younger children including grandchildren, and maintaining the home, which they could have been carrying out for several years while living with their disease.13 As such, patients living with mBC may require assistance with these daily tasks, from caregivers, friends, and family members that previously were of no concern.8

Solutions to help patients living with mBC engage and support one another.

Patients living with mBC often experience feelings of isolation and decreased sense of autonomy as their disease may limit them from maintaining their roles as parents, spouses, and professionals. As a result, mBC is experienced by patients differently from early-stage breast cancer (eBC) or other cancers, which greatly affects the way patients with mBC think and feel.8

The attributes of mBC mean it is critical for patients living with the disease to engage with a community of fellow patients, to share information and experiences. Patients with mBC often feel isolated and misunderstood as the minority in the larger breast cancer community, as eBC patients are often associated with survivorship.8,14 They wish to be connected with each other to feel less alone and better understood. Peer support networks offered by patient support organizations are particularly important to patients with mBC but often challenging to implement.8

A smart, intuitive solution that adapts to mBC patients’ needs throughout the course of their disease can allow patients with mBC to feel empowered and supported.

This global challenge seeks to close the gaps in mBC care and catalyze the development of meaningful solutions to support patients along the care continuum and improve their overall quality of life. This opportunity is open to developers, entrepreneurs, designers, and innovators around the world to develop integrated solutions that empower patients living with mBC.


Timeline

The challenge is organized into three phases with goals that correlate to successive stages in the technology development. The development to beta phase involves additional mentoring, funding and support to get to a viable prototype.

Phase I: Submitting concepts for a tech-enabled solution that addresses the challenge question


Phase II: Partnering with technology mentors and development of functioning prototypes of the solution


Phase III: Live Pitch Event

 

Important Dates

Challenge Launch/Registration Opens: September 27, 2016

Q&A Webinars: November - December 2016

Phase I Deadline: January 20, 2017

Semi-finalists Selection: March 2017

Phase II Mid challenge Pitch Session & Finalists Selection: May 2017

Phase III Deadline: June 2017

Live Pitch Event/Announcement of Winner: June 20, 2017 at HxRefactored in Cambridge, MA

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Evaluation Criteria

The challenge evaluation will be done in three phases. Phase I will consist of the review of creative concepts. The top 5 teams from the first phase will move to Phase II. Phase II will consist of mentoring from industry experts and the development of functioning prototypes. 3 Finalists will move on to the Phase III live pitch event. A grand winner and 2nd place prize will be awarded at the live pitch event.

 

Submission Requirements


 

What Success Looks Like

Successful solutions will be unique tools that demonstrate concepts different from ones that already exist in the market. Its disruptive solutions that go beyond oncology-related products and programs already existing or in development from Pfizer or other healthcare organizations to transform the care of patients living with mBC. 

Many products already exist in the market to support the needs of cancer patients. Some include lifestyle management tools to help with everyday tasks, digital resources for educational content and well-being advice, services to create patient communities, and communication tools to connect patient and provider or cancer patient communities. 

The best solutions for this challenge will support and empower patients living with mBC along the care continuum and be specific to mBC. We are looking for solutions that are user-friendly, visually engaging and intuitive. Solutions should push the limits of personalization, be relevant to the individual user and remain supportive as the patient’s needs change over time. Lastly, it is important that the solution demonstrates a potential for scalability and sustainability. This is not an exercise to develop tools for specific disease interventions or technologies for clinical therapy decision-making.


 

Winners from each phase will be announced through Health 2.0's media channels, to promote their success in the challenge. Health 2.0’s network includes professionals across the healthcare landscape that are interested in learning more about digital health innovation.

For the full Challenge Terms and Conditions, please click here.

 

Steering Committee

An international Steering Committee made up of oncology healthcare providers; metastatic breast cancer (mBC) patients and cancer survivors; and innovation and oncology experts from Pfizer Inc. will serve as the review panel and act as a high level support network for the Challenge.

Wendy Mayer

VP Strategy and New Business Innovative Pharma, Pfizer

Dr. Maria Koehler, M.D, Ph.D

Vice President, Strategy, Innovation and Collaborations, Pfizer Oncology

Doris Schmitt, Ph.D

Professor, Technical University of Munich, and Patient Representative

 
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Dr. Johannes Ettl, M.D

Senior Gyneco-oncologist, Breast Center of Klinkum Rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Germany

 

Miriam Slome

Metastatic Breast Cancer Patient

Doug Ulman

President and Chief Executive Officer, Pelotonia

Dr. Lillie D. Shockney, RN., BD., MAS

University Distinguished Service Professor of Breast Cancer, JHU School of Medicine, Professor of Surgery and Oncology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Administrative Director, Johns Hopkins Breast Center, Two time breast cancer survivor, Registered Nurse

Dr. Sunil Verma, M.D, MSEd, FRCPC

Medical Oncologist & Medical Director, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Professor and Head of Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary